Extracting social indicators from international law

It’s commonly accepted that there are a range of international legal instruments of relevance to the seafood supply chain. The pressing question for our work is how international law can inform the development of social indicators. When it comes to extreme, different legal regimes collide. In respect to shrimp peeling farms and aquaculture that takes place within the territory of a given country, the laws that come into play include a host of ILO Conventions (including the Forced Labour Convention), various human rights instruments and even organised crime instruments, including the Trafficking in Persons Protocol. Depending on how far downstream - or out at sea - we are looking, maritime la

Four Essential Conversations to Have with Your Vendors

Very often brands and retailers themselves do not own or even work directly with the factories manufacturing the products they sell. Vendors and Sourcing Agents play a crucial role in our global supply chain and work in the middle of the system, maintaining and overseeing the direct relationship with factories, and helping the brands and retailers meet their sourcing and production needs. They are essential links, often acting as the vehicles for messaging and communication about ethical trade expectations. These key business partners are more than just gate-keepers that allow access to factories abroad, they also play a critical role in interpreting expectations, communicating priorities, a

A look on forced labour

January 6, 2017 | Plerig Viezin, Wethica This winter has seen several media reporting on slaves used by boats of fisheries in South Asia. Fortunately such cases are not frequently found in more industrial supply chains. Unfortunately, we meet nonetheless forced labor situations in many different locations. IlO has indeed set one more step to fight the forced labor issues by issuing a protocol (P29) which will start to be implemented by the end of the year. It reminds some principle of the convention C29 and highlights some potential means to fight the forced labor in today’s context (the convention C29 dates of 1930). But back to the CSR. Our own experience of finding forced labor situation

A look on forced labor

This winter has seen several media reporting on slaves used by boats of fisheries in south Asia. Fortunately such cases are not frequently found in more industrial supply chains. Unfortunately, we meet nonetheless forced labor situations in many different locations. IlO has indeed set one more step to fight the forced labor issues by issuing a protocol (P29) which will start to be implemented by the end of the year. It reminds some principle of the convention C29 and highlights some potential means to fight the forced labor in today’s context (the convention C29 dates of 1930). But back to the CSR. Our own experience of finding forced labor situation during audits show’s factories are actual

The blog reflects the work of the "Seafood Supply Chain Social Experts" group, whose role is to identify the right data and metrics for better social analytics and compliance. 
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